Show: Maine Social Justice

Episode: 0203 MSJ The Role of Government and Churches and Nuclear Weapons


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Episode Description:

In the Summer of 2012, an 84 year old nun, a Vietnam veteran and a carpenter entered the nuclear processing facility in Oak Ridge, Tennessee and for hours painted peace slogans and banged on walls. Finally, security showed up to detain them. The Y-12 Three, as they were called, sang songs and offered food to the security guards. On May 9th of 2013, the three were convicted of breaking into a government facility and were supposed to receive sentences on January 27th of this year. The judge post-poned the sentencing until February 12th. He said, because of the snow storm in Georgia. Court was not closed until afternoon and the sentencing was to occur in the morning. Hundreds of Y-12 supporters from throughout the country were on hand on the 27th. Most of those folks would be unable to return in February. The Y-12 Three acted on their conciences. They were not violent. They merely wanted to bring about nuclear disarmament. After the brief story about them, Bruce Gagnon and the Reverend Bill Bliss of Bath will discuss the relationship between government and churches in regards to human rights. They speak candidly about the evil of nuclear weapons.

Episode Short Description: N/A

Downloads of This Episode:

[SD File Downloads]: 5

[HD File Downloads]: 0

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SD (Standard Definition) File

File Name of SD Episode: 0203 MSJ The Role of Government and Churches and Nuclear Weapons.mpg

Total SD Episode Video Runtime (hh:mm:ss): 00:34:43

File Size of SD Episode Video: 2,264,239,693 Bytes

Resolution of SD Episode Video: 720x480

Date SD Episode Video Uploaded: Wednesday, February 12, 2014 - 08:43


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